Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

More News

Highlights

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Lois M. Verbrugge photo

Arthritis disability and heart disease disability

Publication Abstract

Verbrugge, Lois M., and L. Juarez. 2008. "Arthritis disability and heart disease disability." Arthritis and Rheumatism, 59(10): 1445-57.

OBJECTIVE: Arthritis is the most common health condition in midlife and late life, and heart disease is the leading cause of death. This article compares disability impacts of these 2 preeminent health problems. METHODS: Using data from the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement, we studied specific limitations and disabilities, accommodations used (buffers), and accommodations needed (barriers) for US population groups of adults with arthritis disability, heart disease disability, both arthritis and heart disease disability, and disability due to other conditions. Weights and complex SE adjusted for sample design. We hypothesized that arthritis disability is more extensive and troublesome than heart disease disability. RESULTS: People with arthritis disability had more numerous, longer, and more bothersome disabilities than people with heart disease disability. People with arthritis disability used more equipment and rehabilitation, whereas people with heart disease disability emphasized personal assistance, medications, and medical services. People with arthritis disability experienced more barriers and needs in activities and services. People with disabilities from both arthritis and heart disease were especially disadvantaged, with high levels of limitations and accommodations. People with disability from other conditions had the highest social participation, fewest disabilities, and most tailored accommodations of all groups. CONCLUSION: Arthritis had higher and more extensive disability impact than heart disease. Both groups had more difficulty, buffers, and barriers in their lives than people disabled by other conditions. Therefore, arthritis and heart disease are premier conditions for disability attention and alleviation in the US population.

DOI:10.1002/art.24107 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next