Close Companion Friends, Self-Expression, and Psychological Well-Being in Late Life

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Krause, Neal. 2010. "Close Companion Friends, Self-Expression, and Psychological Well-Being in Late Life." Social Indicators Research, 95(2): 199-213.

This study has two central aims. Both are associated with self-expression, which is defined as the ability to fully utilize one's own talents and abilities. The first goal is to see if self-expression reduces depressive symptoms over time whereas the second aim is to see whether close companion friends help older people more fully utilize their talents and abilities. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey of older people in the United States suggest that older people who are able to find an outlet for their talents and abilities experience fewer symptoms of depression over time than older adults who do not feel they have been able to use their talents and abilities. The findings further reveal that older people who have a good relationship with a close companion friend are more likely to experience higher levels of self-expression

DOI:10.1007/s11205-008-9358-9 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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