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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Race and ethnic differences in religious involvement: African Americans, Caribbean blacks and non-Hispanic whites

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Chatters, L.M., R.J. Taylor, K.M. Bullard, and James S. Jackson. 2009. "Race and ethnic differences in religious involvement: African Americans, Caribbean blacks and non-Hispanic whites." Ethnic and Racial Studies, 32(7): 1143-1163.

This study examined differences in religious participation and spirituality among African Americans, Caribbean blacks (black Caribbeans) and non-Hispanic whites. Data are taken from the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative study of African Americans, black Caribbeans and non-Hispanic whites. Selected measures of organizational, non-organizational and subjective religious participation were examined. African American and Caribbean blacks were largely similar in their reports of religious involvement; both groups generally indicated higher levels of religious participation than non-Hispanic whites. African Americans were more likely than black Caribbeans to be official members of their places of worship, engage in activities (choirs, church clubs) at their place of worship and request prayer from others. Black Caribbeans reported reading religious materials more frequently than African Americans. The discussion notes the importance of examining ethnic differences within the black American population of the United States.

DOI:10.1080/01419870802334531 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2962581. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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