Millennials and the World of Work: Experiences in Paid Work During Adolescence

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Staff, J., and John E. Schulenberg. 2010. "Millennials and the World of Work: Experiences in Paid Work During Adolescence." Journal of Business and Psychology, 25(2): 247-255.

This article considers some important questions faced by youth as they enter and adapt to paid work. We focus on two key questions: (1) how many hours should teenagers work during the school year and (2) what available jobs are desirable? To help answer these questions, we review studies that have examined the effects of early work experiences on academic achievement, positive youth development, and health-risk behaviors. We also draw upon nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study to illustrate some new findings on youth employment. Moderate work hours, especially in jobs of higher-quality, are associated with a broad range of positive developmental outcomes. These questions are not only important to teenagers and their parents, they also reflect key debates among scholars in sociology, developmental psychology, and economics regarding the potential short- and long-term consequences of early work experiences for social development and socioeconomic achievement. Although work intensity is an important dimension of adolescent work experience, it is clearly not the only one and we argue that it may not even be the most important one. By focusing on types and qualities of jobs, more can be gained in terms of understanding for whom and under what conditions teenage work does provide benefits for and detriments to youth development.

10.1007/s10869-010-9167-4

PMCID: PMC2872249. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search | Books

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Sarah Miller comments on the U.S. Census Bureau report that found that the percentage of Americans without health insurance jumped.

Geronimus writes about her research on "weathering," or the constant presence of stress hormones in the body from our ceaseless daily grind over years & decades, & how stress is actually killing us.

'Ban the Box' Laws Could Negatively Impact Minorities, according to a study by Agan and Starr

More News

Highlights

National Study of Caregiving (NSOC) Extended

Fabian Pfeffer receives Doris Entwisle Early Career Award from American Sociological Association

More Highlights


Connect with PSC follow PSC on Twitter Like PSC on Facebook