Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Indian lab cofounded by Adhvaryu demonstrates links among women's skills training, employment, welfare, and company profits

Bleakley says state educational initiatives favoring skills-oriented career training may have more ROI for employers than workers

Bailey's study linking Pill access to women's wage gains bolsters NYT critique of federal anti-contraception moves

More News


PDHP invites applications for Faculty Small Grants in support of population science

ISR seeking applicants for new Community Guides program

PRB policy communication training for pre-docs extends application deadline to March 12

Needham, Hicken, Mitchell and colleagues link maternal social disadvantage and newborn telomere length

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 2, 2018, noon: Sean Reardon on Educational Inequality

Lauren Nicholas photo

Can Food Stamps Help to Reduce Medicare Spending on Diabetes?

Publication Abstract

Nicholas, Lauren. 2011. "Can Food Stamps Help to Reduce Medicare Spending on Diabetes?" Economics and Human Biology, 9(1): 1-13.

Diabetes is rapidly escalating amongst low-income, older adults at great cost to the Medicare program. I use longitudinal survey data from the Health and Retirement Study linked to administrative Medicare records and biomarker data to assess the relationship between Food Stamp receipt and diabetes health outcomes. I find no significant difference in Medicare spending, outpatient utilization, diabetes hospitalizations and blood sugar (HbA1c) levels between recipients and income-eligible nonrecipients after controlling for a detailed set of covariates including individual fixed effects and measures of diabetes treatment compliance. As one-third of elderly Food Stamp recipients are currently diabetic, greater coordination between the Food Stamp, Medicare, and Medicaid programs may improve health outcomes for this group.

DOI:10.1016/j.ehb.2010.10.003 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3032985. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next