Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

Pfeffer comments on Fed report that reveals 20-year decline in net worth among American families

More News

Highlights

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

ASA President Bonilla-Silva takes exception with Chief Justice Roberts' 'gobbledygook' jab

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Global Demographic Convergence? A Reconsideration of Changing Intercountry Inequality in Fertility

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Dorius, Shawn F. 2008. "Global Demographic Convergence? A Reconsideration of Changing Intercountry Inequality in Fertility." Population and Development Review, 34(2): 519-537.

This research challenges the notion that the second half of the twentieth century was a period of global demographic convergence. To be sure, fertility rates fell substantially during the period, but with considerable un-evenness. The declines in total fertility across population-weighted countries were sufficiently disproportionate that intercountry fertility inequality, estimated using standard measures of inequality, did not begin to decline until at least 1995. Regression analysis also shows that only very recently did lagging countries begin to catch up with countries that began the transition to low fertility earlier. Contrary to findings on changing intercountry health inequality, sub-Saharan Africa has had a greater impact on changes in fertility inequality than China. The trend in fertility inequality, where convergence is a relatively new phenomenon, stands in contrast to trends in inequality in other domains, such as income, education, and health.

DOI:10.1111/j.1728-4457.2008.00235.x (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next