Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

More News

Highlights

Bailey et al. find higher incomes among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Socioeconomic Gradients in Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Middle-Income Countries: Evidence of Effect Modification by Urbanicity in Argentina

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Fleischer, N.L., Ana V. Diez Roux, M. Alazraqui, H. Spinelli, and F. De Maio. 2011. "Socioeconomic Gradients in Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Middle-Income Countries: Evidence of Effect Modification by Urbanicity in Argentina." American Journal of Public Health, 101(2): 294-301.

Objectives. We investigated associations of socioeconomic position (SEP) with chronic disease risk factors, and heterogeneity in this patterning by provincial-level urbanicity in Argentina. Methods. We used generalized estimating equations to determine the relationship between SEP and body mass index, high blood pressure, diabetes, low physical activity, and eating fruit and vegetables, and examined heterogeneity by urbanicity with nationally representative, cross-sectional survey data from 2005. All estimates were age adjusted and gender stratified. Results. Among men living in less urban areas, higher education was either not associated with the risk factors or associated adversely. In more urban areas, higher education was associated with better risk factor profiles (P<.05 for 4 of 5 risk factors). Among women, higher education was associated with better risk factor profiles in all areas and more strongly in more urban than in less urban areas (P<0.05 for 3 risk factors). Diet (in men) and physical activity (in men and women) were exceptions to this trend. Conclusions. These results provide evidence for the increased burden of chronic disease risk among those of lower SEP, especially in urban areas. (Am J Public Health. 2011;101:294-301. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2009.190165)

DOI:10.2105/ajph.2009.190165 (Full Text)

Country of focus: Argentina.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next