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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Who Has the Time? The Relationship Between Household Labor Time and Sexual Frequency

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Gager, C.T., and Scott T. Yabiku. 2010. "Who Has the Time? The Relationship Between Household Labor Time and Sexual Frequency." Journal of Family Issues, 31(2): 135-163.

Motivated by the trend of women spending more time in paid labor and the general speedup of everyday life, the authors explore whether the resulting time crunch affects sexual frequency among married couples. Although prior research has examined the associations between relationship quality and household labor time, few have examined a dimension of relationship quality that requires time: sexual frequency. This study tests three hypotheses based on time availability, gender ideology, and a new multiple-spheres perspective using the National Survey of Families and Households. The results contradict the hypothesis that time spent on household labor reduces the opportunity for sex. The authors find support for the multiple-spheres hypothesis suggesting that both women and men who "work hard" also "play hard." Results show that wives and husbands who spend more hours in housework and paid work report more frequent sex.

DOI:10.1177/0192513x09348753 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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