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Increasing time to baccalaureate degree in the United States

Publication Abstract

Bound, John, Michael Lovenheim, and Sarah E. Turner. 2010. "Increasing time to baccalaureate degree in the United States." Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research)Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

Time to completion of the baccalaureate degree has increased markedly in the United States over the last three decades, even as the wage premium for college graduates has continued to rise. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of the High School Class of 1972 and the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988, we show that the increase in time to degree is localized among those who begin their postsecondary education at public colleges outside the most selective universities. In addition, we find evidence that the increases in time to degree were more marked amongst low income students. We consider several potential explanations for these trends. First, we find no evidence that changes in the college preparedness or the demographic composition of degree recipients can account for the observed increases. Instead, our results suggest that declines in collegiate resources in the less-selective public sector increased time to degree. Furthermore, we present evidence of increased hours of employment among students, which is consistent with students working more to meet rising college costs and likely increases time to degree by crowding out time spent on academic pursuits.

Country of focus: United States of America.

Later Issued As:
Bound, John, Michael Lovenheim, and Sarah E. Turner. 2012. "Increasing Time to Baccalaureate Degree in the United States." Education Finance and Policy, 7(4): 375-424. DOI. Abstract.

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