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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Reynolds Farley photo

The Waning of American Apartheid?

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionFarley, Reynolds. 2011. "The Waning of American Apartheid?" Contexts, 10(3): 36-43. American Sociological Association.

Racial residential segregation has a long and persistent history in the United States. It determines the quality of education available to children, the availability and quality of health care, exposure to crime, employment opportunity, the quality of municipal services, home value, and so on. Residential segregation is a lens to assess the degree to which the United States has achieved racial equality. In this article, Reynolds Farley says that while black-white segregation is still high in many metropolises, recent data show that racial diversity has risen in many U.S. cities and that racial attitudes have changed -- suggesting that racial residential segregation will continue to decline in the future.

Publisher Information

Country of focus: United States of America.

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