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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Discrimination, Mastery, and Depressive Symptoms Among African American Men

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Watkins, D.C., D. Hudson, C. Caldwell, K. Siefert, and James S. Jackson. 2011. "Discrimination, Mastery, and Depressive Symptoms Among African American Men." Research on Social Work Practice, 21(3): 269-277.

Purpose: This study examines the influence of discrimination and mastery on depressive symptoms for African American men at young (18-34), middle (35-54), and late (55+) adulthood. Method: Analyses are based on responses from 1,271 African American men from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Results: Discrimination was significantly related to depressive symptoms for men ages 35 to 54 and mastery was found to be protective against depressive symptoms for all men. Compared to African American men in the young and late adult groups, discrimination remained a statistically significant predictor of depressive symptoms for men in the middle group once mastery was included. Implications: Findings demonstrate the distinct differences in the influence of discrimination on depressive symptoms among adult African American males and the need for future research that explores the correlates of mental health across age groups. Implications for social work research and practice with African American men are discussed.

DOI:10.1177/1049731510385470 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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