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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and the Risk of Institutionalization and Death: The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Okura, T., B. Plassman, D. Steffens, D. Llewellyn, G. Potter, and Kenneth M. Langa. 2011. "Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and the Risk of Institutionalization and Death: The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 59(3): 473-481.

OBJECTIVES To examine the association between neuropsychiatric symptoms and risk of institutionalization and death. DESIGN Analysis of longitudinal data. SETTING The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS). PARTICIPANTS Five hundred thirty-seven adults aged 71 and older with cognitive impairment drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). MEASUREMENTS Neuropsychiatric symptoms (delusions, hallucinations, agitation, depression, apathy, elation, anxiety, disinhibition, irritation, and aberrant motor behaviors) and caregiver distress were identified using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. A consensus panel in the ADAMS assigned cognitive category. Date of nursing home placement and information on death, functional limitations, medical comorbidity, and sociodemographic characteristics were obtained from the HRS and ADAMS. RESULTS Overall, the presence of one or more neuropsychiatric symptoms was not associated with a significantly higher risk for institutionalization or death during the 5-year study period, although when assessing each symptom individually, depression, delusions, and agitation were each associated with a significantly higher risk of institutionalization (hazard rate (HR)=3.06, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.09-8.59 for depression; HR=5.74, 95% CI=1.94-16.96 for clinically significant delusions; HR=4.70, 95% CI=1.07-20.70 for clinically significant agitation). Caregiver distress mediated the association between delusions and agitation and institutionalization. Depression and hallucinations were associated with significantly higher mortality (HR=1.56, 95% CI=1.08-2.26 for depression; HR=2.59, 95% CI=1.09-6.16 for clinically significant hallucinations). CONCLUSION Some, but not all, neuropsychiatric symptoms are associated with a higher risk of institutionalization and death in people with cognitive impairment, and caregiver distress also influences institutionalization. Interventions that better target and treat depression, delusions, agitation, and hallucinations, as well as caregiver distress, may help delay or prevent these negative clinical outcomes.

DOI:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03314.x (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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