Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Buchmueller says employee wages are hit harder than corporate profits by rising health insurance costs

Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

More News

Highlights

Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Parental Job Loss, Parental Ability and Children’s Educational Attainment

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Download PDF versionWightman, Patrick. 2012. "Parental Job Loss, Parental Ability and Children’s Educational Attainment." PSC Research Report No. 12-761. 6 2012.

The recent recession has focused attention on the effects of job loss and unemployment, but job loss is a common experience even during times of economic expansion. While much is known about the impact of job loss on the earnings, income, and unemployment of adults, less is understood regarding the relationship between parental displacement and children's outcomes. I estimate the effect of parental job loss on children's educational attainment. In particular, I focus on the role of parental ability, both cognitive and non-cognitive, using observed measures of parents' attributes and an instrumental variable analysis to account for unobserved attributes. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) I find that experiencing a parental job loss during childhood reduces the probability that an offspring will obtain any post-secondary education (by age 21) by at least 10 percent and perhaps as high as 50 percent. Furthermore, household resources, including family income and wealth, do not explain this effect.

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next