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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a rural population in Ghana

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Gyakobo, M., A.B. Amoah, D. Martey-Marbell, and Rachel C. Snow. 2012. "Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a rural population in Ghana." BMC Endocrine Disorders, 12.

Background: The Metabolic syndrome (MS) which is a constellation of cardiometabolic risk factors including dyslipidaemia, hypertension, hyperglycaemia, central obesity, and endothelial dysfunction was hitherto relatively uncommon among Africans south of the Sahara. This study seeks to determine the prevalence of MS, its components and risk factors among a rural population in Ghana based on two popular international algorithms. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of a rural population in Ghana conducted between November and December, 2007. Two hundred and twenty-eight (228) settler farmers, families and staff associated with the GOPDC Ltd, between the ages of 35 and 64 years, were randomly selected for the study; pregnant women were excluded. The prevalence of MS was estimated using the IDF and ATPIII criteria. Results: The final subject pool included 102 males, and 104 females. The mean age of all subjects was 44.4 +/- 6.9 years. The overall prevalence of MS by the IDF and ATPIII criteria were 35.9% and 15.0%, respectively, but there was an alarming female preponderance by both criteria {IDF: males = 15.7%, females = 55.8%; ATPIII: males = 5.9%, females = 24.0%; sex differences p<0.001 for both criteria}. The most important determinants for IDF-defined MS were central obesity (55.3%), low High Density Lipoprotein (42.7%) and high Blood Pressure (39.5%). Conclusion: The triad of central obesity, high blood pressure and low HDL were most responsible for the syndrome in this rural population.

DOI:10.1186/1472-6823-12-25 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3534326. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: Ghana.

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