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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Zhenmei Zhang photo

Neglect of Older Adults in Michigan Nursing Homes

Publication Abstract

Zhang, Zhenmei, Lawrence Schiamberg, James Oehmke, Gia Barboza, Robert Griffore, Lori Post, Robin Weatherhill, and Teresa Mastin. 2011. "Neglect of Older Adults in Michigan Nursing Homes." Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 23(1): 58-74.

Although research on domestic elder abuse and neglect has grown over the past 20 years, there is limited research on elder neglect in nursing homes. The purpose of this study is to estimate the incidence of elder neglect in nursing homes and identify the individual and contextual risks associated with elder neglect. Data came from a 2005 random digit dial survey of individuals in Michigan who had relatives in long term care. Our analytic sample included 414 family members who had a relative aged 65 or older in nursing homes. Results showed that about 21% of nursing home residents were neglected on one or more occasion in the last 12 months. Two nursing home residents' characteristics reported by family members appear to significantly increase the odds of neglect: functional impairments in activities of daily living and previous resident-to-resident victimization. Behavior problems also are associated with higher odds of neglect (p = 0.078). Policy implications of these results are discussed.

DOI:10.1080/08946566.2011.534708 (Full Text)

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