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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Race Differences in the Receipt of Mental Health Services Among Young Adults

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Broman, Clifford L. 2012. "Race Differences in the Receipt of Mental Health Services Among Young Adults." Psychological Services, 9(1): 38-48.

This study investigates race and ethnic differences in the receipt of mental health services among young adults. Research has indicated that racial minorities receive treatment at a much lower rate than those with middle and upper incomes and Whites. We use data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative study of young adults, first interviewed when in Grades 7 through 12. We find significant differences across race-ethnicity. Consistent with prior research, Blacks are less likely to have received mental health services. Findings for gender and education differed from previous studies. The relationship of gender on services receipt is mediated by depression. The relationship of race-ethnicity on services receipt is moderated by levels of education and prior services use. Education is associated with greater services use for Whites, but less services use for Blacks. Also, Blacks who used services in the past are significantly less likely to be current users. The implications of these results are discussed.

DOI:10.1037/a0027089 (Full Text)

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