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Cervical cancer screening among Michigan women: 'The Special Cancer Behavioral Risk Factor Survey', 2004-2008

Publication Abstract

Pierce Campbell, C.M., M. Darwish-Yassine, Sioban D. Harlow, C.M. Johnston, M.P. Curado, K.R. Cho, and A.S. Soliman. 2013. "Cervical cancer screening among Michigan women: 'The Special Cancer Behavioral Risk Factor Survey', 2004-2008." Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 33(6): 617-621.

The burden of cervical cancer remains greater among minority women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate racial/ethnic disparities in cervical cancer screening among minority women in Michigan. Data from 8,023 women (≥ 40 years) surveyed in the 2004-2008 Michigan Special Cancer Behavioral Risk Factor Survey were used to assess racial/ethnic differences in cervical cancer screening, knowledge and beliefs. Unexpectedly, African-American and Hispanic women reported being screened for cervical cancer at rates similar to, or higher than, Whites. Women demonstrated limited knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors and its signs/symptoms. Most minority women were more likely than Whites to believe in the importance of cervical screening, with Hispanic women more likely to support HPV vaccination. Differential utilisation of screening does not explain the disproportionately high rates of cervical cancer among minorities. Future research should examine disparities in the follow-up of abnormal cervical results and receipt of treatment. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.

DOI:10.3109/01443615.2013.783006 (Full Text)

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