Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Xu et al find lower cognition at midlife for adults born during China's 1959-61 famine

UM's Wolfers on separating deep expertise from partisanship in analyses of economic condtions

Findings by Burgard, Kalousova, and Seefeldt on the mental health impact of job insecurity

More News

Highlights

Apply by Jan 8 for NIA-supported PSC post-doc fellowship, to begin Sept 1, 2018

On Giving Blue Day, help support the next generation through the PSC Alumni Grad Student Support Fund or ISR's Next Gen Fund

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

John E. Knodel photo

Grandparents and Grandchildren: Care and Support in Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam

Publication Abstract

Knodel, John E., and Minh Duc Nguyen. 2015. "Grandparents and Grandchildren: Care and Support in Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam." Ageing and Society, 35(9): 1960-1988.

Recent surveys in Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam reveal that substantial proportions of persons aged 60 and older co-reside with grandchildren and commonly provide grandparental care. Usually the grandchildren's parents are also present. Situations in which the grandchildren's parents are absent are considerably less frequent. Parents are commonly the main source of the grandchildren's financial support even if absent. Most grandparents that provide care do not consider it a serious burden even when the grandchild's parents are absent. Moreover, grandparental care is not always one-directional as grandchildren can also be of help to grandparents. These features of grandchild care reflect a regional cultural context that views acceptance of reciprocal intergenerational obligations as normal and in which co-residence of older persons and adult children is still common. Differences in economic development and past fertility trends account for much of the observed differences in grandparental care among the three countries by affecting grandchildren availability and migration of adult children. In addition, economic development and demographic trends will continue to shape grandparental care in the coming decades. Despite the lack of attention to development and demographic context in previous studies, these aspects of the changing societal context deserve a prominent place within conceptual frameworks guiding comparative research on grandparenting.

DOI:10.1017/S0144686X14000786 (Full Text)

First view

Countries of focus: Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next