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Older Adults' Residential Proximity to Their Children: Changes After Cardiovascular Events

Publication Abstract

Choi, HwaJung, Robert F. Schoeni, Kenneth M. Langa, and Michele Heisler. 2015. "Older Adults' Residential Proximity to Their Children: Changes After Cardiovascular Events." Journals of Gerontology B: Psychological and Social Sciences, 70(6): 995-1004.

Using a nationally representative longitudinal study of older adults in the U.S., we assessed changes in family residential proximity after a first cardiovascular (CV) event and identified families most likely to experience such moves. Using a sample of respondents with no prior diagnosis of CV disease (CVD) who subsequently developed stroke, heart attack, and/or heart failure, we examined changes in their residential proximity to their closest child before and after the CV event. We then compared the likelihood of changes in proximity between families with and without CV events. Finally, we determined which types of families are most likely to relocate following a CV event.

Results. Having a first CV event increases the 2-year predicted probability of children and adult parents moving in with and closer to each other (relative risk ratio = 1.61 and 1.55, respectively). Families are especially likely to move after a first CV event if the older person experiencing the event is spouseless or has a daughter.

CVD is a leading cause of disability, which in turn creates a significant need for personal care among older adults. Assessment of changes in family residential proximity responding to CV events is important to fully understand the consequences of older adults' CV events including the cost of caregiving.

DOI:10.1093/geronb/gbu076 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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