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The location of placement and juvenile delinquency: Do neighborhoods matter in child welfare?

Publication Abstract

Huang, Hui, and Joseph P. Ryan. 2014. "The location of placement and juvenile delinquency: Do neighborhoods matter in child welfare?" Children and Youth Services Review, 44: 33-45.

This study aims to advance the knowledge base by investigating where foster youth are placed in terms of neighborhood characteristics and whether specific neighborhood characteristics were associated with delinquency for adolescents in the child welfare system. This study followed the placement experiences of 2360 foster youth in Chicago from birth to 16 years of age. The study used State administrative data, census data, and the community survey of the Project of Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. The results indicated that foster care placements cluster in neighborhoods characterized by high concentrated disadvantage, low ethnic heterogeneity, low collective efficacy, prevalent neighborhood disorder and violent culture. The results indicated that neighborhood ethnic heterogeneity is positively associated with delinquent offending. The implications for policy and practice are discussed.

DOI:10.1016/j.childyouth.2014.05.023 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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