Correlates of Perceived HIV Prevalence and Associations With HIV Testing Behavior Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in the United States

Publication Abstract

White, Darcy, and Rob Stephenson. 2016. "Correlates of Perceived HIV Prevalence and Associations With HIV Testing Behavior Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in the United States." American Journal of Men's Health, 10(2): 90-99.

As the rate of HIV infection continues to rise among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States, a focus of current prevention efforts is to encourage frequent HIV testing. Although levels of lifetime testing are high, low levels of routine testing among MSM are concerning. Using data from an online sample of 768 MSM, this article explores how perceptions of HIV prevalence are associated with HIV testing behavior. Ordinal logistic regression models were fitted to examine correlates of perceived prevalence, and binary logistic regression models were fitted to assess associations between perceived prevalence and HIV testing. The results indicate that perceptions of higher prevalence among more proximal reference groups such as friends and sex partners are associated with greater odds of HIV testing. Perceptions of HIV prevalence were nonuniform across the sample; these variations point to groups to target with strategic messaging and interventions to increase HIV testing among MSM.

10.1177/1557988314556672

Country of focus: United States of America.

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