Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Social Science One making available data that "may rival the total amount that currently exists in the social sciences"

Stafford's findings on gender gap in children's allowances suggest entrenched nature wage gap

Sastry et al. find parents with childhood trauma more likely to have children with behavioral health problems

More News

Highlights

Student volunteers needed for IAPHS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, Oct 3-5. Register July 23.

West et al. examine HS seniors' nonmedical use of prescription stimulants to boost study

Seefeldt promoted to associate professor of social work, associate professor of public policy

Martha Bailey elected to the Board of Officers of the Society of Labor Economists

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

More PSC brown bags, Fall 2018

Exploring repeat HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Publication Abstract

Siegler, Aaron J., Rob Stephenson, Patrick S. Sullivan, Alex de Voux, Nancy Phaswana-Mafuya, Linda-Gail Bekker, Stefanie D. Baral, Kate Winskell, et al. 2015. "Exploring repeat HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, South Africa." AIDS Care, 27(2): 229-234.

Despite the high prevalence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) - and the general adult population - in South Africa, there is little data regarding the extent to which MSM seek repeat testing for HIV. This study explores reported histories of HIV testing, and the rationales for test seeking, among a purposive sample of 34 MSM in two urban areas of South Africa. MSM participated in activity-based in-depth interviews that included a timeline element to facilitate discussion. Repeat HIV testing was limited among participants, with three-quarters having two or fewer lifetime HIV tests, and over one-third of the sample having one or fewer lifetime tests. For most repeat testers, the time gap between their HIV tests was greater than the one-year interval recommended by national guidelines. Analysis of the reasons for seeking HIV testing revealed several types of rationale. The reasons for a first HIV test were frequently one-time occurrences, such as a requirement prior to circumcision, or motivations likely satisfied by a single HIV test. For MSM who reported repeat testing at more timely intervals, the most common rationale was seeking test results with a sex partner. Results indicate a need to shift HIV test promotion messaging and programming for MSM in South Africa away from a one-off model to one that frames HIV testing as a repeated, routine health maintenance behavior.

DOI:10.1080/09540121.2014.947914 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC4286446. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: South Africa.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next