Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Adhvaryu on how promoting worker welfare contributes to profitability in India's garment industry

Murphy says suburban communities that declined in the 1960s fared better than those declining since the Great Recession

Levy et al find state budget gains outweigh Medicaid expansion costs in Michigan

More News


Live coverage of former Census director on crucial issues surrounding Census 2020. TODAY 2 pm.

PDHP invites applications for Faculty Small Grants in support of population science

ISR seeking applicants for new Community Guides program

PRB policy communication training for pre-docs extends application deadline to March 12

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 2, 2018, noon: Sean Reardon on Educational Inequality

Social Network Composition and Sexual Risk-Taking Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Atlanta, GA

Publication Abstract

Finneran, Catherine, and Rob Stephenson. 2014. "Social Network Composition and Sexual Risk-Taking Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Atlanta, GA." AIDS and Behavior, 18(1): 59-68.

Social network composition is known to effect patterns of reported sexual risk-taking among men who have sex with men (MSM); however, consensus as to the directionality and size of these effects is lacking. We examined the relationships between novel aspects of social network composition and sexual risk-taking using a cross-sectional survey of 870 MSM. Social network composition was found to have mixed effects on reported sexual risk-taking: reporting proportionally more lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB)-identified friends and reporting friends who were on average significantly older than the respondent were both associated with reporting increased sexual risk, while reporting proportionally more LGB-identified friends in relationships and reporting a social network proportionally more aware of the respondent's homosexuality/bisexuality were both associated with reporting decreased sexual risk. The support structures created by differing social network compositions—and particularly the presence of LGB couples—may be a potential area for targeting sexual risk-reduction interventions for MSM.

DOI:10.1007/s10461-013-0569-y (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC4046889. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next