Intimate Partner Violence, Minority Stress, and Sexual Risk-Taking Among U.S. Men Who Have Sex With Men

Publication Abstract

Finneran, Catherine, and Rob Stephenson. 2014. "Intimate Partner Violence, Minority Stress, and Sexual Risk-Taking Among U.S. Men Who Have Sex With Men." Journal of Homosexuality, 61(2): 288-306.

This article examines the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among a national sample of Internet-recruited U.S. men who have sex with men (MSM) (n = 1,575), and associations between reporting of IPV, minority stress, and sexual risk-taking. Five outcomes are examined: experiences of physical and sexual violence, perpetration of physical and sexual violence, and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) at last sexual encounter. MSM who reported experiencing more homophobic discrimination and internalized homophobia were more likely to report experiences of IPV. The results point to the need for prevention messages to address the external and internal stressors that influence both violence and sexual risk among MSM.

10.1080/00918369.2013.839911

Country of focus: United States of America.

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