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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Awareness Sources and Stages in the Adoption of Specific Contraceptives

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Palmore, J.A. 1968. "Awareness Sources and Stages in the Adoption of Specific Contraceptives." Demography, 5, no.2 (1968): 960-72.

The paper explores the factors affecting the process whereby a woman comes to adopt the use of a particular contraceptive. Stages in the adoption process are 1) becoming aware of availability of birth-control option, 2) learning how to use option, and 3) trying method after learning how to use it. During October-December 1962, before the start of a program disseminating family-planning information, 1367 married women aged 20-39 were interviewed in Taichung, Taiwan. The 1227 women who were reinterviewed during October-December 1963 provided the data for the present analysis. The data shows that the type of contraceptive, the source of knowledge about the contraceptive, and the interaction of these factors all affect the woman's adoption process. The program increased awareness of all methods but it was most pronounced for IUCD, oral tablets, foam tablet, and condom. There was variability in the percentage who progressed from aware to informed and from that to actual trial, according to contraception method awareness. A greater percentage of those whose husbands were the source of awareness progressed to informed, and those whose awareness sources were husband or mass media were more likely to continue to actual trial. Before the program the majority of contraceptive information came from friends, relatives, and neighbors. Between surveys more than 1/2 of the new awareness of methods came from home visitors from the program and group meetings.

http://www.jstor.org/stable/2060285

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