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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Dirgha J. Ghimire photo

Impact of the spread of mass education on married women's experience with domestic violence

Publication Abstract

Ghimire, Dirgha J., William G. Axinn, and Emily Smith-Greenaway. 2015. "Impact of the spread of mass education on married women's experience with domestic violence." Social Science Research, 54: 319-331.

This paper investigates the association between mass education and married women's experience with domestic violence in rural Nepal. Previous research on domestic violence in South Asian societies emphasizes patriarchal ideology and the widespread subordinate status of women within their communities and families. The recent spread of mass education is likely to shift these gendered dynamics, thereby lowering women's likelihood of experiencing domestic violence. Using data from 1775 currently married women from the Chitwan Valley Family Study in Nepal, we provide a thorough analysis of how the spread of mass education is associated with domestic violence among married women. The results show that women's childhood access to school, their parents' schooling, their own schooling, and their husbands' schooling are each associated with their lower likelihood of experiencing domestic violence. Indeed, husbands' education has a particularly strong, inverse association with women's likelihood of experiencing domestic violence. These associations suggest that the proliferation of mass education will lead to a marked decline in women's experience with domestic violence in Nepal.

DOI:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2015.08.004 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC4607934. (Pub Med Central)

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