Segmented Assimilation: A Comparison of the Factors Related to the Adjustment of Domestic and International Muslim Migrants to Bangkok

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Ford, Kathleen, and Aree Jampaklay. 2015. "Segmented Assimilation: A Comparison of the Factors Related to the Adjustment of Domestic and International Muslim Migrants to Bangkok." Journal of Population and Social Studies, 23(1).

This paper uses segmented migration theory to consider differences in demographic characteristics, adjustment and concerns between domestic and international Muslim migrants to Bangkok. Face-to-face individual interviews were conducted with 183 international and 104 domestic male and female migrants. Both the domestic and international migrants adjusted reasonably well to life in Bangkok. Most were employed at the time of the survey and were at least moderately satisfied with their lives in Bangkok. The domestic male migrants were on average younger than the international migrants and most had migrated to Bangkok when they were young adults. Many of the migrants had university education (52% male domestic, 60% female domestic, 40% male international, and 29% female international). The migrants also reported concerns about their future lives and difficulty with language. The Islamic faith and Islamic education were important factors in the adjustment of the migrants to Bangkok.

DOI:10.14456/jpss.2015.4 (Full Text)

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