Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

Patrick and colleagues analyze high-intensity drinking among adolescents

More News

Highlights

Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Neal Krause photo

Assessing Supportive Social Exchanges Inside and Outside Religious Institutions: Exploring Variations among Whites, Hispanics, and Blacks

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal. 2016. "Assessing Supportive Social Exchanges Inside and Outside Religious Institutions: Exploring Variations among Whites, Hispanics, and Blacks." Social Indicators Research, 128(1): 131-146.

Little is known about race/ethnic differences in the exchange of social support inside as well as outside religious institutions. The purpose of this study is to assess differences in giving and receiving social support inside and outside the church among Whites, Hispanics, and Blacks. Two types of social support are evaluated when support is assessed inside the church: emotional support and spiritual support. Spiritual support refers to informal assistance from fellow church members that is designed to bolster the religious beliefs and practices of the recipient. The findings reveal that Blacks receive and give more emotional and spiritual support inside the church than Whites or Hispanics. However, meaningful differences failed to arise between Whites and Hispanics. In contrast, no differences were found between the three racial/ethnic groups in support that is exchanged outside the church. These findings suggest that religious influences rather than race/ethnicity per se are likely to be at work.

DOI:10.1007/s11205-015-1022-6 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next