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Xu et al find lower cognition at midlife for adults born during China's 1959-61 famine

UM's Wolfers on separating deep expertise from partisanship in analyses of economic condtions

Findings by Burgard, Kalousova, and Seefeldt on the mental health impact of job insecurity

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Apply by Jan 8 for NIA-supported PSC post-doc fellowship, to begin Sept 1, 2018

On Giving Blue Day, help support the next generation through the PSC Alumni Grad Student Support Fund or ISR's Next Gen Fund

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Neal Krause photo

Landmark Spirituality and Health Survey

a PSC Research Project

Investigator:   Neal Krause

Some studies suggest that people who are greatly involved in religion tend to enjoy better physical and mental health than individuals who are less involved. But at least three problems with these findings must be overcome. First, researchers have proposed many ways in which religion may affect health, making it hard to determine how the beneficial effects might arise. Second, a number of studies on religion and health have been conducted with college students, making it hard to know if the findings apply to a more representative group. Third, if religion affects health, then researchers must identify the specific physiological mechanisms that are at work. This project approaches the study of religion and health with a comprehensive battery of religion measures, a large nationally representative sample of adults, and a range of biomarkers that can show how religion may affect physiological changes in the body.

Funding Period: 06/01/2013 to 05/31/2016

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