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Shaefer on study showing US spends less on poorest children, more on the elderly, than it did 20 years ago

Kruger on how women assess men who display conspicuous consumption

Cech analyzes impacts on employees of "ideal worker norms" and workplace flexibility bias

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Call for Papers: PSID User Conference 2018: Child Wellbeing and Outcomes in Childhood, Young Adulthood, and over the Lifecourse

Martha Bailey elected to the board of the Society of Labor Economists

Patrick Kline wins SOLE's Sherwin Rosen Prize for "Outstanding Contributions in the Field of Labor Economics"

Charlie Brown elected to the board of the Society of Labor Economists

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Next Brown Bag

More PSC brown bags, Fall 2018

Neal Krause photo

Landmark Spirituality and Health Survey

a PSC Research Project

Investigator:   Neal Krause

Some studies suggest that people who are greatly involved in religion tend to enjoy better physical and mental health than individuals who are less involved. But at least three problems with these findings must be overcome. First, researchers have proposed many ways in which religion may affect health, making it hard to determine how the beneficial effects might arise. Second, a number of studies on religion and health have been conducted with college students, making it hard to know if the findings apply to a more representative group. Third, if religion affects health, then researchers must identify the specific physiological mechanisms that are at work. This project approaches the study of religion and health with a comprehensive battery of religion measures, a large nationally representative sample of adults, and a range of biomarkers that can show how religion may affect physiological changes in the body.

Funding Period: 06/01/2013 to 05/31/2016

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