Home > Research . Search . Country . Browse . Small Grants

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Xu et al find lower cognition at midlife for adults born during China's 1959-61 famine

UM's Wolfers on separating deep expertise from partisanship in analyses of economic condtions

Findings by Burgard, Kalousova, and Seefeldt on the mental health impact of job insecurity

More News

Highlights

Apply by Jan 8 for NIA-supported PSC post-doc fellowship, to begin Sept 1, 2018

On Giving Blue Day, help support the next generation through the PSC Alumni Grad Student Support Fund or ISR's Next Gen Fund

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Martha J. Bailey photo

How Does Automated Record Linkage Affect Inferences about Population Health?

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   Martha J. Bailey, Catherine Massey, Eytan Adar

This project compares the performance of automated linking algorithms with the goal of improving their potential. Automated linking methods are required to complete the NSF-funded Longitudinal Intergenerational Family Electronic Micro-dataset (LIFE-M), which will link millions of US vital records to historical decennial census records to create an extensive longitudinal dataset covering individuals born in the US from 1880 to 1930. This analysis emanates from that need.

The project will produce systematic evidence regarding the performance of the most popular automated linking methods in terms of match rates, representativeness of the underlying population, erroneous match rates, and systematic measurement error. It will also examine how phonetic name-cleaning methods affect quality. Significantly, the project will analyze how match quality metrics vary for different underrepresented subgroups - including women, racial/ethnic minorities, and immigrants - to determine how specific linking methods could differentially affect inferences for different populations. Finally, the project will formulate recommended practices for researchers based upon the findings.

Funding Period: 09/15/2017 to 05/31/2019

Search . Browse